About your Search

20110701
20110731
STATION
CNNW 19
CNN 18
MSNBC 3
MSNBCW 2
CSPAN 1
CSPAN2 1
KPIX (CBS) 1
WETA 1
WHUT (Howard University Television) 1
WJZ (CBS) 1
WUSA (CBS) 1
LANGUAGE
English 56
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 56 (some duplicates have been removed)
rooms in brussels, can do about it. >> they were the worst floods in pakistan's history and a year ago today torrents of water were tearing through villages, destroying everything in their path. almost 2,000 people killed and 2 million homes destroyed. many families are still struggling with little help from the authorities. we have a report from northwest pakistan. >> the rainy season is just starting again. harmless as the water looks now, it has filled people here with dread. it is brought back the memory of images like these from last year, heaviest rains ever recorded reeked havoc across pakistan. nearly 20 million people were affected. this village was one of the first places the flood struck. people here had no warning of the disaster that was coming their way. villagers say a massive wall of water came through here from that direction and hit the village and destroyed a lot of the houses and caused a lot of deaths. in fact, a year on they still haven't found all of the bodies of those who were swept away. this woman did manage to find her two teenage daughters, but it took days
operations in pakistan? >> let me say a couple things about that. number one, from the outset of the administration we determined that we would launch an aggressive, focused, relentless effort on al qaeda and associated groups to dismantle, disrupt and ultimately defeat them. we've been doing that successfully. and we're going to continue these efforts and these efforts are focus the on al qaeda central and south asia but also focused on affiliates around the world, number one. number two, we have the capability to continue this. without commenting on the story that you have outlined here, i have every confidence we can continue this, that we will continue this effort at a pace in an intensity that will allow to us put al qaeda -- continue to put al qaeda on the road to defeat with respect to the pakistanis. the pakistanis, fareed, and the united states have a complicated relationship, as you know. there will be frustrations and disagreements. we remained engaged with the pakistanis for a number of very important reasons related to our national security and ultimately their se
much, much harder on the diplomatic front with afghanistan, pakistan, and the rest of the region. >> i think a formal accord would be desirable, i agree entirely. even so, it would probably be a fig leaf rather than an actual settlement to the problem there. if we don't get it or can't get it, that shouldn't stop us from going away. >> one of the things you point out in the piece which i thought was very striking was that there was all this opposition and huge intense opposition in this country to the bombing of cambodia because that was seen as crossing an international border. of course, we do that every week now in our drone attacks in pakistan which is it functionally exactly the same thing? pakistan has become a safe haven just as cambodia was and we follow in hot pursuit as it were. >> anyone who's watched a war movie, when you have a tactical retreat, you leave one guy behind to cover and shoot. the other people go away. that's what you have to do militarily on the ground even as we're pulling out our forces, we should be striking hard and aggressively so the enemy can't follow
laden's compound in pakistan and terror group is now within reach. david is live from kabul, afghanistan. >> reporter: the duly appointed defense secretary arrived here a few hours ago to find out for himself the situation on the ground here. he has brief talks with military officials including david petraeus and then he went straight into a meeting with the afghan president hamid karzai. their discussions included the transition of nato held areas of afghan control starting in july but also the drawdown of u.s. troops over the next year. he says he hopes to drive the taliban into peace talks over that period. he also said he was upbeat about prospects of defeating al-qaeda if they can capture and kill remaining leaders. >> i would say somewhere around 10 to 20 key leaders, between pakistan, yemen, so somalia and north africa, if we can go after them, i think we really can strategically defeat al-qaeda. >> he also said the targeting of leaders such as the al-qaeda chief ayman al-zawahri continues to limit their ability to conduct attacks. he may just go well over the border in pakistan's
the pakistan border. this is a critical area for the insurgents and the cross border infiltration and this is a historic avenue for movement from pakistan into afghanistan. in terms of the risk to u.s. troops, how will you characterize this? >> there is a significant amount of influx of insurgent fighters in the area, mostly from pakistan moving into afghanistan. >> tell us a little bit about your mission. >> this the standard reconnaissance mission, along the historic route from pakistan. the terrain is inaccessible, so we are going there to see what this looks like for a future clearing operation. the major challenges the terrain, which is extreme and very difficult to move. and also, the people there have not seen the coalition presence in some time. >> what do you hope to achieve to the mission. >> to accept these conditions for future operations and build our awareness of the atmosphere, so that we can continue the operations there. this is for the clear insurgent presence in the area. >> how do you tell if you have succeeded? >> the numbers that occur in the area, we have re
pipeline, iran-pakistan-india. the u.s. state department stood up and said, this is not going to happen. does it go through anyway as a litmus test? >> i think what was unfortunate is the problem between india and pakistan, that they didn't want -- on continuedian side to rely on the gas on going through pakistan. they thought maybe it should be offshore and so on. i think as far as iran and pakistan is concerned or the two are concerned, the deal is going quite a long way ahead on the iranian side. on the pakistani side there is so many announcements. of course, over 20 years, announcements are announcements, but they seem a bit more serious. >> pipeline politics indeed. it's become a major source of contention between lebanon and israel. they're warning israel to stay away from the country's energy resources but leaders of the hezbollah group calls on them for an energy exploration. maritime dispute over who owns what are escalating already heightened tensions between two countries. we take a special look. >> reporter: under the warm waters of the mediterranean may lie treasures yet u
military operations in pakistan? >> a couple of things about that. number one, from the outset of the administration we determined we would launch an aggressive, focused, relentless effort on al qaeda and associated group to disrupt and dismantle them and we have been doing that successfully. the ranks have been decimated as the president said in his speech in afghanistan. and we will continue these efforts. these efforts are focused on al qaeda central in south asia and affiliates around the world. number two. we have the capability to continue to do this. and without commenting on the story you have outlined here, i have every confidence we can and will continue this effort at a pace and intensity that will allow us to put al qaeda on the road to defeat with respect -- with respect to the pakistanis, there is a complicated relationship and there are frustrations and disagreements. we remain engaged with the pakistanis for a number of important reasons related to our national security and i think their ultimate security. they are an important counterterrorism partner for the u
is pakistan and a lot of the leadership resides in pakistan. we have to have a realistic assessment of the true assessment in pakistan, because there's no doubt that there is connections between isi and the aconnie network who are responsible not only for the hotel tragedy there, but also for the attacks on americans and our allies. and that's not acceptable. >> to libya now. we have seen in the middle east and elsewhere that often when there is the removal of a leader that chaos ensues. we certainly saw that in iraq to a certain extent we're still seeing it in egypt. do you think the u.s. and northern african countries have any kind of plan on what would happen and what they would do about likely chaos is moammar gadhafi should leave. the man has chemical weapons. he has ground to air missiles. all of those, as you know, could fall into the wrong hands. what is the u.s. plan here? >> i think the u.s. plan there is to provide assistance and do the things that, in fact, i would have recognized the transition national council a long time ago as a legitimate voice of the libyan people.
're going to find out what pakistan's top spy is now doing here in the united states and whether it will help the relationship get any better. [ male announcer ] to the seekers of things which are one of a kind. the authentic, the rare, the hard to define. to those always searching for what's pure and what's real from we who believe we know just how you feel. haagen-dazs. aflac! oh, i've just got major medical... major medical. ...but it helps pay the doctors. pays the doctors, boyyy! [ quack ] oh yeah? what about your family? ♪ we added aflac, so we get cash! it's like our safety net... ♪ to help with the mortgage or whatever we need! so my family doesn't feel the pain too. ha! [ male announcer ] help protect your family at aflac.com. [ pigeons ] heyyy! hooo!!! it's schwab at your fingertips wherever, whenever you want. one log in lets you monitor all of your balances and transfer between accounts, so your money can move as fast as you do. check out your portfolio, track the market with live updates. and execute trades anywhere and anytime the inspiration hits you. even depo
the remaining leaders. >> somewhere around 10 to 20 key leaders that between pakistan, yemen, somalia, aqim and north africa, those are -- if we can go after them, i think we really can strategically defeat al-qaeda. >> he also said the targeting of leaders such as the new al-qaeda chief continues to limit their ability to conduct attacks. he said he believes the al-qaeda leader may well be just over the border in pakistan's northwestern tribal areas. and general petraeus, who leaves his post here this month to head the c.i.a., also said today, al-qaeda was on the run, in his opinion. enormous damage is being done to the al-qaeda network over the border in pakistan. back to you. >> rick: david piper on the phone from kabul for us. thanks for the update. >> rick: getting the royal treatment, a polo club in california hosting a future king, prince william is taking part in a charity polo match right now and his new bride, the duchess of cambridge is on hand cheering him on. the royal couple mingling with hollywood royalty on their trip to the u.s. casey stegall live in santa barbara. who is a
is the deadline to raise the debt ceiling. >>> the relationship between the u.s. and pakistan. the u.s. is withholding $800 million in military aid to that country. white house chief of staff bill daly confirmed this on abc this week. the two countries are allies but major trust issue between the two, especially after u.s. special forces found osama bin laden hiding inside pakistan. >>> after 168 years as britain's top selling paper, the last edition of news around the world came out. allegations its staffers hacked into the phones of celebrities. rupert murdoch was seen reading the last ed igts. told 200 people laid off they can apply for jobs elsewhere in the company. a report from london, straight ahead. >>> britain's prince william and his wife catherine are heading home after their whirlwind tour of california and canada. the royal newkne newlyweds left an inpregs. prince william hailed the troops that he called the front lines of a remarkable relationship between the u.s. and britain. >>> a nasa space shuttle is now docked with the international space station for the final time
. pakistan? where would you focus your attention? >> pakistan's an important challenge. there's not much we can do about it. we've tried all sorts of things there and nothing seems to work. i would say revitalizing our relationships in asia and the pacific. that's where history the going to be written in the 21st surgeriry. i would say involved there. better relations with ind ka ya with the countries of southeast asia. doing something about our energy situation that we're less vulnerable on vagaries of price and supply that would go a long way. again, i'd focus more at home on competitiveness, on improving our immigration policy. on the quality of our schools. on the quality of our transportation infrastructure and so forth. again, we have got to retore the foundations of american power. that's a prerequisite if we're going to lead in the world either by what we do or our example. >> restoration is the theme. i hope it's the subject of the next book. thanks so much for joining us. >> thanks, andrea. >> it's very provocative richard. >>> a word of warning the images you're about to see is h
. call or click today. >>> pakistan arrest as doctor for helping the cia in its efforts to nail osama bin laden. dr. t. is accused of trying to collect dna from people in bin laden's compound to prove he was there. cnn's reza sayah joins us live from islamabad. give us a sense about this doctor. he allegedly set up this fake vaccination drive? what was that about? >> reporter: yeah. we've been trying to put together bits and pieces of this alleged plot, and it really gives you a fascinating glimpse of how the cia was operating on the ground here in pakistan before the raid on the bin laden compound. a pakistani official has telling us this doctor has been arrested, accused of helping the cia to confirm the whereabouts of osama bin laden and allegedly stage add free vaccination campaign offering free vaccinations and shots to children and residents of abbottabad where the bin laden compound was located. according to the british paper "the guardian" he hired two nurses going around from house to house. the plan was to get to the bin laden children, somehow extract some of their blood or use
insurgents in pakistan and it shows more than a dozen men believed to be pakistani policemen lined up. there they are, against the backdrop of the hillside with their hands tied behind their backs facing several men with rifles on the right side of your screen. this man shouting is accusing them of killing children in a crime against islam. and there they are, the men opening fire. now we froze the video right there because if you continue to watch, it gets even more graphic, even more brutal from that point on. c nrks nr cnn's reza sayah is taking up from here. >> reporter: we warn you, this is explicit video, some of you may find this very disturbing, if you want to turn away, this is a good time to do so. we want to walk you through the video, it shows at least 14 men lined up, all of them wearing traditional pakistani garb, all of them appear to have their hands tied behind their back. we assume these are taliban fighters, one of them is scolding the man who are lined up, saying that these executions are about to take place in revenge for six children allegedly executed by pakista
, about $1 billion so far, check out my blog. cnn.com/situationroom. from pakistan, a very graphic video released by taliban showing 16 men being executed. >> this is a graphic look at how brutal and ugly the war against the taliban can get. some of you may find this very disturbing. if you would like to turn away, this is a good time to do so. let's walk you through this video. it was released by the taliban, posted online. men wearing traditional pakistani garb, all of them with their hands tied behind their back. in front of them, you see three armed men, you assume these are taliban fighters. one of them is scolding the men who are lined up, accusing them of being enemies of islam, saying these executions are about to take place for six children. the military here vehemently denies those excuses took place. after the scolding is over, that's when you see and hear the gunfire. you see the men topple to the ground, some of them moaning and writhing in pain. we're not going so show you what happened next. some of the gunmen walk up to the men and shoot them again, sometimes in an effort
that occurred originally back in the '40s between india and pakistan, a couple hundred muslims live inside -- >> millions. that's okay. >> live inside india and there are extremist groups with india as opposed to pakistani base that go over to india responsible for similar small-scale attacks. so nobody is clear yet who it is, but i think you're right. the fact that indian officials didn't immediately blame or cast doubt that it was pakistan suggests that they don't think it is. >> and also you just made a point we were talking ak. 200 million muslims in country of india makes india one of the largest -- the largest muslim country in the world? >> exactly. indonesia and india, countries with the largest number of muslims in the world. indians often present that evidence to westerners. >> sure. >> saying we know how to work closely with our multiple populations. we're a large democracy and see how things go so well. it doesn't always go so well in that country. >> move to syria. both in new york and washington we're obsess with the debt talks and defaulting and obviously for important reaso
the speckter of the isi in pakistan. >> this morning, new evidence suggests the bombs were planted at a bus shelter, also on a motorcycle and near a parked car. this really shows that these devices were designed to cause maximum casualties and they all went off within a span of 15 minutes, and again, the simultaneous nature of the attacks is a signature of terrorism, heather. heather: they did their jobs. catherine, what does this attack mean for the u.s.? >> well, look, immediately in washington, the focus went back to three years ago and these attacks in mumbai, that was a series of attacks orchestrated by ten pakistani militants armed with cell phones, hand guns and backpacks with explosives. analysts here say if this latest attack causes friction between india and pakistan that could be serious trouble for the u.s. let's listen: >> if the attack were a cause to try to provoke a crisis between india and pakistan that would have major implications for the united states. we do not want to see those two countries go into another crisis and perhaps fight another war, which they've done three
signal nato weakness, implications in places like syria and egypt and have implications like pakistan, as well. a lot rides on this more than just getting rid of khadafy, who yet again in past days has called for a return to terrorism something he used before and is threatening again. one more reason to get rid of him. >> gregg: last question -- there is a new study by the eisenhower research project and it concluded that u.s. involvement in afghanistan, pakistan and iraq has cost up to 4 trillion dollars over the past decade. your reaction to that? >> i think that study is badly flawed for a number of reasons. it's counting costs we would have incurred anyway for the existence of the military. it does focus on the potential explosion of medical costs. that is something i think even defenders of the defense department have said for some time that is an area of cost cutting we ought to be looking at. badly flawed but there are points worth taking into account going forward. >> gregg: unless anyone thinks we forgets, more than 6,000 american lives in various wars over the past decade, h
and influenced china in term which influenced india which may be influencing pakistan. that same pattern may be beginning to happen in africa as we have some real success stories in other countries thinking if rwanda can do it, why can't we? >> we'll have to leave it at that. thank you very much. we will be right back. >> if i can finish now -- oh, yes, why don't you meow when i woman does that. between accoun, so your money can move as fast as you do. check out your portfolio, track the market with live updates. and execute trades anywhere and anytime the inspiration hits you. even deposit checks right from your phone. just take a picture, hit deposit and you're done. open an account today and put schwab mobile to work for you. >>> canada pulled the last of the combat troops out of afghanistan this week. this brings us to our question of the week. how many nations still have combat troops in afghanistan as part of the international security assistance force? is it a, 6, b, 16, c, 26 or d 46. stay tuned and we'll tell you the correct answer. go to cnn.com/gps for ten more questions. while yo
. outpost caught between hills full of taliban. if the americans leave, militants from pakistan will flow through the valley. if they stay, then every few days, this happens. the mortars hit the base. the last attack was long enough ago there's panic. they're worried the taliban have been preparing a big one. after days of nothing, the insurgents are getting attacked from all sides. >> come on, hustle up. >> reporter: they use mortars first, aiming fortal ban talibae hills. but the incoming fire is very accurate here. >> go, go, go! >> reporter: they arrange cover from heavy machine guns. but the bullets are too close. locals scatter. just before huge american fire power has the last word. four massive air strikes across the hills and then the taliban fall silent. america knew why it came here, but isn't sure why it's staying. >> can we get like a police call for like cigarette butts? >> absolutely. >> reporter: ten minutes later, jets swoop into strafe the hills. a show of force for the taliban are now either gone or dead, at least five killed by the soldiers count. the next morning, it
and we do speaking and we help christians that are being persecuted in countries like pakistan. and we help christians who are suffering all throughout the middle east. >> how do you do that? >> none of your business. >> none of your business? that's interesting. our investigation continues tomorrow night, right? what are we going to see tomorrow? >> yeah. tomorrow, how he makes a business out of his expertise, how these donations to his cause end up with a so-called foundation owned by his business partner. and also the bigger question, anderson, why are our taxpayers going to pay this guy? he can say whatever he is wants. but where are the people vetting these so-called terrorism experts that are suddenly making a lot of money in this country? >> that's interesting. drew, fascinating. we'll continue to follow up. we'll have that report part two tomorrow. thanks, drew, a lot >>> coming up, you may not have been following the war in libya recently. but tonight you are going to get as close to the come bats as anyone can. our ben wedeman and his crew caught in the crossfire today litera
interests or an authorization debate in the congress. given all that is at stake in pakistan, afghanistan, iran, saudi arabia, egypt, syria, yemen and elsewhere in the islamic world, a rational strategic assessment would not devote sizable american military and economic resources to a civil war in libya. it is an expensive diversion that leaves the united states and our european allies with fewer assets to respond to other contingencies. under the constitution, it is our responseability to determine whether we should be a party to libya's civil war. as a part of this process we will consider the terms and scope of the joint resolution before us today. i'm concerned this resolution would provide broad authorities, permitting significant expansion of the united states military involvement in libya's civil war. the resolution would authorize the president to reescalate united states military involvement in libya, to and potentially beyond the lead role it played at the beginning of the operation when the united states carried out intensive airstrikes on a daily basis. the resolution would on
afghanistan, pakistan. you're reading a couple pieces in the "new york times." now it's spreading to all of these different countries and one that really jumped off the page for me, drone attacks in somalia. >> joining us, jeremy scahill, on the cia secret sites in somalia, jeremy, the secret training programs and secret prisons out of somalia is part of your reporting there. how big a threat are these terrorist group there's? >> we should say first of all president obama campaigned on a promise to go up against these bush era policies declaring war on the world, running secret sites, torturing prisoners. deeply involved in an underground dungeon officially run by the somali national security agency, but their salaries are paid by the cia directly. in fact, one somali agent described thousand hairli ed ho and paid by u.s. agents and the u.s. is interrogating prisoners, including those rendered by the kenyan government, snatched off the streets in nairobi based on u.s. intelligence and taken to this secret prison and interrogated. it goes against the president's ordered he signed in janua
persecuted in places like pakistan, and we help christians who are suffering throughout the middle east. >> how do you do that? >> none of your business. >> isn't it anyone's business that donates to you? >> of course. but, you see, a lot of the times, if you disclose information of who you are helping, it ends up biting them. >> reporter: he leads us to his manager who was down the hall selling the anti-islam books. when cnn had questions about the high ranks on the board of advisers, he said to get the number from davies. >> can you tell us who they are? >> off the top of my head, yes. let me see. i am trying to think. the names have gone blank. they will come back to me in a second. major general -- ah, i can't -- the four-star -- there was a three-star general at the air force, irish name, thomas -- i usually know these by hearts. >> reporter: davies did come up with one name, a pilot but no contact details despite repeated requests from cnn. we made calls to the individual anyway, but he never called us back. the group's public tax forms lists only davies and a real estate develope
now for panetta is to keep attacking al qaeda in pakistan, yemen, and somalia. >> now is the moment following what happened with bin laden to put maximum pressure on them. because i do believe that if we continue this effort that we can really cripple al qaeda. as a threat to this country. >> the u.s. has long said it believes al qaeda remains very interested in high-profile attacks and would like nothing better than to bring down a u.s. aircraft. apparently, osama bin laden was even talking about assembling a team of operatives. but of course, those navy s.e.a.l.s killed him in the compound before he could carry out the plan any further. >> general petraeus, i take it is getting ready to leave afghanistan, heading over to the cia? >> very soon. in fact, the change of command ceremony that will turn everything over in afghanistan to marine corps general john allen will take place monday morning in kabul. petraeus will get on a plane, come back to the united states, retire from years of service in the active duty army, and, in fact, in the coming weeks will do exactly that. take over
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 56 (some duplicates have been removed)